Comments on: Shortcodes Should Never Be Included With Themes. Period. http://www.themelab.com/put-shortcodes-in-a-plugin/ We build High Quality, Good Looking Premium WordPress Themes that are Easy to Use and ready for just about anything. Tue, 28 Jun 2016 19:01:53 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.1 By: Josh Stauffer http://www.themelab.com/put-shortcodes-in-a-plugin/#comment-34996 Mon, 12 Aug 2013 02:56:28 +0000 http://www.themelab.com/?p=3233#comment-34996 While I agree shortcodes should reside within a plugin instead of a theme, the unparsed code will still appear when the plugin is disabled or replaced by another shortcode plugin. Either way it can be a hassle for the person performing the changeover.

Learning basic HTML seems best.

]]>
By: Ihor Vorotnov http://www.themelab.com/put-shortcodes-in-a-plugin/#comment-23885 Sun, 28 Jul 2013 19:17:33 +0000 http://www.themelab.com/?p=3233#comment-23885 Totally agree on this. Themes should handle layout and styles. Anything that adds some extra features must go in a plugin.

]]>
By: Mathew Porter http://www.themelab.com/put-shortcodes-in-a-plugin/#comment-23865 Sat, 27 Jul 2013 11:35:41 +0000 http://www.themelab.com/?p=3233#comment-23865 I have the same stance on shortcodes, but can see the reasoning for some themes including them for non tech savy users to add features easily and in turn helps sell more of developers themes.

]]>
By: Mel http://www.themelab.com/put-shortcodes-in-a-plugin/#comment-23828 Thu, 25 Jul 2013 00:57:20 +0000 http://www.themelab.com/?p=3233#comment-23828 here here.

It would also be nice if there was some sort of elegant degradation for shortcodes that are no longer active.

]]>
By: Jens Kilgenstein http://www.themelab.com/put-shortcodes-in-a-plugin/#comment-23780 Mon, 22 Jul 2013 13:32:47 +0000 http://www.themelab.com/?p=3233#comment-23780 Thus, possible problems can be avoided with functions which may be added in the future in different theme. Issues of maintenance are important purchasing arguments – at least for me!

]]>
By: Geoffrey http://www.themelab.com/put-shortcodes-in-a-plugin/#comment-23744 Sat, 20 Jul 2013 22:33:39 +0000 http://www.themelab.com/?p=3233#comment-23744 I completely agree with you. Very few people stick with one theme forever, unless it’s completely custom (and then you don’t have the themeforest problem) and shortcodes are a pain to deal with. I recently discovered this problem when I started changing from a theme-junkie theme to a studiopress/genesis theme. Now I’ve put the change on hold, despite spending $80 on it already, because there is too much to change even on my new site.

]]>
By: Japh http://www.themelab.com/put-shortcodes-in-a-plugin/#comment-23694 Tue, 16 Jul 2013 07:48:01 +0000 http://www.themelab.com/?p=3233#comment-23694 Hey Leland, great post, thanks for your thoughts!

We’ll be releasing an update to these requirements shortly, based on feedback from our authors, and I hope you’ll be pleased with some of the adjustments we’ve made (specifically in relation to shortcodes) đŸ™‚

]]>
By: Leland http://www.themelab.com/put-shortcodes-in-a-plugin/#comment-23678 Sun, 14 Jul 2013 15:58:19 +0000 http://www.themelab.com/?p=3233#comment-23678 Hey Andrés, no need to apologize for the lengthy reply, you make some great points!

]]>
By: AndrĂ©s Vilarreal http://www.themelab.com/put-shortcodes-in-a-plugin/#comment-23677 Sun, 14 Jul 2013 15:39:19 +0000 http://www.themelab.com/?p=3233#comment-23677 I think it’s not only a compatibility issue with other themes, but a content-related issue too. A shortcode should be just a helper to process content, and themes should only display pre-processed content, not process the content by themselves. When themes process shortcodes on their own, they’re treating that piece of text (or at least it looks like the developer does it) as a call to a visual element, not to a functional one (what it really is), like if the scope of what a theme is for was missing there. That practice shows a lack of clarity about what content, functionality and visualization are, and how those elements should be managed (i.e., content should be stored into DB, functionality should be managed via WP core and plugins, and visualization via themes; just as a very basic example). There’s no need to be a content expert, an experienced programmer or a great designer to know such things, just a little bit of attention and careful thought on what we’re offering to our users, and how easy or difficult will be for them to use our products. I think it’s OK if you don’t know the differences but you’re open to learn and improve, but, on the other hand, to know and have in mind all these things and offer shortcodes (and any other functionality-related stuff) in themes anyway, that seems to me like a disloyal practice that makes your users captives of your product. I know that sometimes the line between visualization and functionality is really thin, but in most cases the difference is non-discussable.

Shorry for the long reply, this is a topic that I’m really interested in. Great post đŸ™‚

]]>
By: Leland http://www.themelab.com/put-shortcodes-in-a-plugin/#comment-23673 Sun, 14 Jul 2013 13:09:27 +0000 http://www.themelab.com/?p=3233#comment-23673 Peter, that’s a perfect example of the problem with shortcode in themes.

It gets even worse when other non-presentational functionality is also included in a theme, maybe something to talk about in a future post.

]]>